urge Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
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Meaning of “urge” in the English Dictionary

"urge" in British English

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urgenoun [C]

uk   /ɜːdʒ/  us   /ɝːdʒ/
C2 a strong wish, especially one that is difficult or impossible to control: The two of them seem unable to control their sexual urges. [+ to infinitive] The urge to steal is very strong in some of these young men.

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urgeverb [I or T]

uk   /ɜːdʒ/  us   /ɝːdʒ/
C1 to strongly advise or try to persuade someone to do a particular thing: [+ to infinitive] Lawyers will urge the parents to take further legal action. [+ that] Investigators urged that safety procedures at the site should be improved. Police urged continued vigilance in the fight against crime. The dogs are urged into fighting more fiercely by loud shouts from the crowd. We will continue to urge for leniency to be shown to these prisoners.

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urging
noun [C or U] uk   /ˈɜː.dʒɪŋ/  us   /ˈɝː.dʒɪŋ/
With their dad's urging, the girls started playing tennis at a young age. It was only because of Michele's urgings that he sold the house.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of urge from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"urge" in American English

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urgeverb [T]

 us   /ɜrdʒ/
  • urge verb [T] (ADVISE)

to encourage someone strongly to do something or to ask that something be done: Party leaders urged her to run for Congress.
Phrasal verbs

urgenoun [C]

 us   /ɜrdʒ/
  • urge noun [C] (DESIRE)

a strong desire or need: a human/natural urge Sometimes I get an urge to go swimming at lunchtime.
(Definition of urge from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“urge” in British English

“urge” in American English

A bunch of stuff about plurals
A bunch of stuff about plurals
by ,
May 24, 2016
by Colin McIntosh One of the many ways in which English differs from other languages is its use of uncountable nouns to talk about collections of objects: as well as never being used in the plural, they’re never used with a or an. Examples are furniture (plural in German and many other languages), cutlery (plural in Italian), and

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