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Meaning of “venture” in the English Dictionary

"venture" in British English

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venturenoun [C]

uk   /ˈven.tʃər/ us   /ˈven.tʃɚ/
C2 a new activity, usually in business, that involves risk or uncertainty: She advised us to look abroad for more lucrative business ventures. There are many joint ventures between American and Japanese companies.

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ventureverb [I usually + adv/prep, T]

uk   /ˈven.tʃər/ us   /ˈven.tʃɚ/ formal
C2 to risk going somewhere or doing something that might be dangerous or unpleasant, or to risk saying something that might be criticized: She rarely ventured outside, except when she went to stock up on groceries. As we set off into the forest, we felt as though we were venturing (forth) into the unknown. She tentatively ventured the opinion that the project would be too expensive to complete, but the boss ignored her.

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Phrasal verbs
(Definition of venture from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"venture" in American English

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venturenoun [C]

us   /ˈven·tʃər/
an activity or plan of action, often in business, that involves risk or uncertainty: His most recent business venture ended in bankruptcy.

ventureverb [I/T]

us   /ˈven·tʃər/
to risk going somewhere or doing something that might be dangerous or unpleasant: [I always + adv/prep] He wanted to venture into the mountainous wilderness of the countryside.
fml To venture something is to attempt it when you are likely to be wrong or to be criticized: [T] I wouldn’t venture an opinion about that.
(Definition of venture from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"venture" in Business English

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venturenoun [C]

uk   /ˈventʃər/ us  
a new business activity: business/commercial venture The firm is looking overseas for more lucrative business ventures. The total value of venture investments increased to $5.6 billion in the second quarter. The American car giant and its venture partner in China are investing millions of dollars to explore ways of reducing reliance on petrol. create/form/set up a venture finance/fund/invest in a venture
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ventureverb

uk   /ˈventʃər/ us  
[I + adverb/prep] to start a new activity, start thinking in a new way, or start doing an activity in a new place: venture into sth There are some excellent deals for new investors venturing into the electronic marketplace. Meanwhile, the insurer has ventured beyond insurance with the launch of its first unsecured personal loan last week. The company has finally decided to venture overseas.
[T] to say something when it is risky to do this: venture a guess/opinion/judgement I don't have enough knowledge to venture a judgement. I was too shy to venture a comment.
(Definition of venture from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“venture” in British English

“venture” in American English

“venture” in Business English

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