view Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “view” in the English Dictionary

"view" in British English

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viewnoun

uk   us   /vjuː/

view noun (OPINION)

B1 [C] an ​opinion, ​belief, or ​idea, or a way of ​thinking about something: Do you have any views about/on what we should do now? In my view, her ​criticisms were ​completelyjustified. [+ that] It's my view that the ​price is much too high. Many ​people have/​hold/​share/take the view thatchildren should not be ​physicallypunished. Everyone will have a ​chance to maketheir views known at the ​meeting. We had a ​friendly exchange of views (= ​discussion). I take a very dim/​poor view of this ​kind of ​behaviour (= ​think that this ​type of ​behaviour is ​unacceptable).world view a way of ​thinking about the ​world: Our ​world view is ​quite different from that of ​writers in the fourth ​century BC.
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view noun (SIGHT)

A2 [C or U] what you can ​see from a ​particularplace, or the ​ability to ​see from a ​particularplace: The view from the ​top of the ​mountain is ​breathtaking/​magnificent/​spectacular. The ​rooftoprestaurant affords a ​panoramic view (= ​allows you to ​see a ​widearea)across the ​bay. Don't ​stand in ​front of me - you're blocking/​obstructing my view of the ​stage. The ​cloudlifted, and the ​tops of the ​mountainssuddenly came into view (= could be ​seen). She ​turned a ​corner, and ​disappeared from view/out of view. [C] a ​picture of a ​particularplace: He ​paintsrural views (= ​pictures of the ​countryside).in view UK close enough to be ​seen: I always make ​sure I ​keep the ​children in view ​whenever we're in a ​publicplace.on view If something is on view, it is ​arranged so that it can be ​seen by the ​public: The ​plans for the new ​road will ​soon be on view to the ​public in the ​library.
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viewverb

uk   us   /vjuː/

view verb (HAVE OPINION)

C2 [T] to have a ​particularopinion or way of ​thinking about someone or something: A ​reporterasked the ​minister how he viewed ​recentevents. She is viewed as a ​strongcandidate for the ​job. We view these ​latestdevelopments withconcern/​suspicion/​satisfaction. If we view the ​problem from a differentangle, a ​solution may ​become more ​obvious. How do you view ​yourprospects/​chances (= what do you ​consideryourchances to be) in tomorrow's ​race?
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view verb (SEE)

C2 [I or T] to ​watch something: There's a ​specialarea at the ​airport where you can view ​aircraft taking off and ​landing. Viewing figures (= the ​number of ​peoplewatching) (= ) for the show were very ​low. [I or T] to ​look at something in a ​complete or ​careful way: We have two ​people coming to view the ​house this ​afternoon. The ​extent of the ​flooding can only be ​fullyappreciated when viewed from the ​air.
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(Definition of view from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"view" in American English

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viewnoun

 us   /vju/

view noun (SIGHT)

[C/U] what you can ​see from a ​particularplace, or the ​ability to ​see from a ​particularplace: [U] She ​turned a ​corner and ​disappeared from view. [C] Our ​room had ​spectacular views of the ​mountains.

view noun (OPINION)

[C] a way of ​looking at something; an ​opinion: It’s ​our view that it’s ​time we did something and ​stopped just ​talking! He ​takes a pessimistic view of ​ourchances of ​success. The ​meeting was an ​opportunity for the two ​leaders to ​exchange views.

viewverb [T]

 us   /vju/

view verb [T] (OPINION)

to ​look at or ​consider something: How do you view ​yourchances of getting that ​job?
(Definition of view from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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