village Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
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Meaning of “village” in the English Dictionary

"village" in British English

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villagenoun

uk   /ˈvɪl.ɪdʒ/  us   /ˈvɪl.ɪdʒ/
A1 [C] a group of houses and other buildings that is smaller than a town, usually in the countryside: a fishing village a mountain village a village shop a village green (= an area of grass in the middle of a village) Many people come from the outlying/surrounding villages to work in the town.
[C usually singular, + sing/pl verb] all the people who live in a village: The village is/are campaigning for a by-pass to be built.

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(Definition of village from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"village" in American English

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villagenoun [C]

 us   /ˈvɪl·ɪdʒ/
a group of houses, stores, and other buildings which is smaller than a town: We live just outside the village of Larchmont.
A village is also the people who live in a village: The whole village came out for the parade.
(Definition of village from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Translations of “village”
in Korean 마을…
in Arabic قَرْية…
in Malaysian kampung, penduduk kampung…
in French (du) village, village…
in Russian деревня…
in Chinese (Traditional) 村莊, 村子, 全體村民…
in Italian villaggio, paese…
in Turkish köy…
in Polish wieś, wioska…
in Spanish pueblo pequeño, pueblo…
in Vietnamese ngôi làng, dân làng…
in Portuguese povoado, vila, lugarejo…
in Thai หมู่บ้าน, ชุมชน…
in German das Dorf, Dorf-……
in Catalan poble, llogarret…
in Japanese 村…
in Chinese (Simplified) 村庄, 村子, 全体村民…
in Indonesian desa, penduduk desa…
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