void Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
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Meaning of “void” in the English Dictionary

"void" in British English

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voidnoun

uk   /vɔɪd/  us   /vɔɪd/
[C usually singular] a ​largehole or ​emptyspace: She ​stood at the ​edge of the ​chasm and ​stared into the void. Before Einstein, ​space was ​regarded as a ​formless void.
[S] a ​feeling of ​unhappiness because someone or something is ​missing: They ​tried to ​describetheirattempts to fill the void left by ​their son's ​death.

voidadjective

uk   /vɔɪd/  us   /vɔɪd/
  • void adjective (NOT ACCEPTABLE)

having no ​legalauthority and ​thereforeunacceptable: The ​lawyers declared the ​contract (null and) void.
See also
  • void adjective (WITHOUT)

void of literary
without; ​lacking in: He's ​completely void of ​charm as ​far as I can ​see.

voidverb [T]

uk   /vɔɪd/  us   /vɔɪd/
to ​remove the ​legalforce from something, such as a ​legalagreement
(Definition of void from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"void" in American English

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voidnoun [C]

 us   /vɔɪd/
  • void noun [C] (EMPTY SPACE)

a ​space with nothing in it: Some ​parents use ​television to ​fill the void they have ​created by not ​spending enough ​time with ​theirkids, he said.

voidadjective [not gradable]

 us   /vɔɪd/
having no ​legalauthority and ​thereforeunacceptable: The ​originalversion of her will was ​declared void.

voidverb [T]

 us   /vɔɪd/
  • void verb [T] (MAKE UNACCEPTABLE)

to ​remove the ​legalforce from an ​agreement or ​contract: I’ll just void the ​check and ​pay you in ​cash.
(Definition of void from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"void" in Business English

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voidadjective

uk   us   /vɔɪd/ LAW
having no ​legalforce and therefore unacceptable: The ​judge declared the ​contract void. The ​election was ​declared void and a new one will take ​place in October.
void ab initio
having no ​legalforce from the beginning: The ​agreement was declared void ab initio because he was under the ​legal age when he ​signed it.

voidverb [T]

uk   us   /vɔɪd/ LAW
to say that a ​contract, ​agreement, etc. no ​longer has ​legalforce: The ​statefiled to void the company's ​license. The ​company announced ​legalaction to void its ​labourcontracts as ​part of its ​reorganization.
(Definition of void from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“void” in Business English

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