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Meaning of “wake” in the English Dictionary

"wake" in British English

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wakeverb [I or T]

uk   /weɪk/ us   /weɪk/ past tense woke or waked, past participle woken or waked also wake up
A1 to (cause someone to) become awake and conscious after sleeping: Did you wake at all during the night? Please wake me early tomorrow. I woke up with a headache. Jane's hand on my shoulder woke me out of/from a bad dream.

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wakenoun [C]

uk   /weɪk/ us   /weɪk/
  • wake noun [C] (WATER)

the waves that a moving ship or object leaves behind: The wake spread out in a v-shape behind the ship.

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(Definition of wake from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"wake" in American English

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wakeverb [I/T]

us   /weɪk/ past tense woke /woʊk/ waked /weɪkt/ , past participle woken /ˈwoʊ·kən/ waked
  • wake verb [I/T] (STOP SLEEPING)

to become awake and conscious after sleeping, or to cause someone to stop sleeping: [I] Did you wake at all during the night? [T] The noise of the storm woke the kids.
waken
verb [I/T] us   /ˈweɪ·kən/
[T] He tried to waken her, but she didn’t stir.

wakenoun [C]

us   /weɪk/
  • wake noun [C] (WATER)

an area of water whose movement has been changed by a boat or ship moving through it: fig. The storm left a massive amount of destruction in its wake.
  • wake noun [C] (GATHERING)

a gathering held before a dead person is buried, at which family and friends talk about the person’s life
(Definition of wake from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“wake” in British English

Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
by ,
May 25, 2016
by Liz Walter Enough is a very common word, but it is easy to make mistakes with it. You need to be careful about its position in a sentence, and the prepositions or verb patterns that come after it. I’ll start with the position of enough in the sentence. When we use it with a noun,

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