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Meaning of “wake” in the English Dictionary

"wake" in British English

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wakeverb [I or T]

uk   /weɪk/  us   /weɪk/ (past tense woke or waked, past participle woken or waked) (also wake up)
A1 to (cause someone to) become awake and conscious after sleeping: Did you wake at all during the night? Please wake me early tomorrow. I woke up with a headache. Jane's hand on my shoulder woke me out of/from a bad dream.

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wakenoun [C]

uk   /weɪk/  us   /weɪk/
  • wake noun [C] (WATER)

the waves that a moving ship or object leaves behind: The wake spread out in a v-shape behind the ship.

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(Definition of wake from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"wake" in American English

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wakeverb [I/T]

 us   /weɪk/ (past tense woke  /woʊk/ or waked  /weɪkt/ , past participle woken  /ˈwoʊ·kən/ or waked)
  • wake verb [I/T] (STOP SLEEPING)

to become awake and conscious after sleeping, or to cause someone to stop sleeping: [I] Did you wake at all during the night? [T] The noise of the storm woke the kids.
waken
verb [I/T]  us   /ˈweɪ·kən/
[T] He tried to waken her, but she didn’t stir.

wakenoun [C]

 us   /weɪk/
  • wake noun [C] (WATER)

an area of water whose movement has been changed by a boat or ship moving through it: fig. The storm left a massive amount of destruction in its wake.
  • wake noun [C] (GATHERING)

a gathering held before a dead person is buried, at which family and friends talk about the person’s life
(Definition of wake from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“wake” in British English

A blazing row: words and phrases for arguing and arguments
A blazing row: words and phrases for arguing and arguments
by ,
May 04, 2016
by Kate Woodford We can’t always focus on the positive! This week, we’re looking at the language that is used to refer to arguing and arguments, and the differences in meaning between the various words and phrases. There are several words that suggest that people are arguing about something that is not important. (As you might

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