war Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “war” in the English Dictionary

"war" in British English

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warnoun [C or U]

uk   /wɔːr/  us   /wɔːr/
A2 armedfighting between two or more ​countries or ​groups, or a ​particularexample of this: nuclear war a war ​film/​grave/​hero/​poet If this ​country goes to (= ​starts to ​fight in a) war we will have to ​face the ​fact that many ​people will ​die. Britain and France declared war on Germany in 1939 as a ​result of the ​invasion of Poland. War broke out between the two ​countries after a ​borderdispute. They've been at war for the last five ​years. He ​died in the First World War/the Vietnam war.war of attrition a war that is ​fought over a ​longperiod and only ​ends when one ​side has neither the ​soldiers and ​equipmentnor the ​determinationleft to ​continuefightingwar of nerves a ​situation, often before a ​competition or battle , in which each ​opposingsideattempts to ​frighten or discourage the other by making ​threats or by ​showing how ​strong it isC2 any ​situation in which there is ​strongcompetition between ​opposingsides or a ​greatfight against something ​harmful: The past few ​months have ​witnessed a price war between ​leadingsupermarkets. The ​presidentvowed to wage war on/againstterrorism. the war ondrugs
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(Definition of war from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"war" in American English

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warnoun [C/U]

 us   /wɔr/
armedfighting between two or more ​countries or ​groups, or a ​particularexample of such ​fighting: [C] Can any ​countryfight two wars at the same ​time? [U] War is something to ​avoid. [U] Several ​nations were at war. A war can also be any ​situation in which there is ​strongcompetition between ​opposingsides or a ​jointeffort against something ​harmful: [C] Airlines ​engage in ​fare wars to ​attract new ​customers. [U] It sometimes ​seems like the war on ​cancer has ​stalled.
(Definition of war from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"war" in Business English

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warnoun [C]

uk   us   /wɔːr/ COMMERCE, ECONOMICS
a ​situation in which ​businesses, countries, etc. ​compete against each other very ​strongly: In the ​supermarket war, Asda ​slashed the ​price of ​petrol.at war The ​banks are at war for each other's ​businessaccounts.lose/wage/win a war The EU is in danger of ​losing the ​propaganda war.
(Definition of war from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Translations of “war”
in Korean 전쟁…
in Arabic حَرْب…
in Malaysian peperangan…
in French (de) guerre…
in Russian война, борьба, соперничество…
in Chinese (Traditional) (國家或群體之間的)戰爭, 爭奪,競爭…
in Italian guerra…
in Turkish harp, savaş, kavga…
in Polish wojna, walka…
in Spanish guerra…
in Vietnamese chiến tranh…
in Portuguese guerra…
in Thai สงคราม…
in German der Krieg, Kriegs-……
in Catalan guerra…
in Japanese 戦争…
in Chinese (Simplified) (国家或群体之间的)战争, 争夺,竞争…
in Indonesian perang…
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