wedge Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary

Meaning of “wedge” in the English Dictionary

"wedge" in British English

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uk   us   /wedʒ/

wedge noun (SHAPE)

[C] a ​piece of ​metal, ​wood, ​rubber, etc. with a ​pointededge at one end and a ​wideedge at the other, either ​pushed between two ​objects to ​keep them still or ​forced into something to ​breakpieces off it: Push a wedge under the ​door to ​keep it ​open while we're ​carrying the ​boxes in. Pieces of ​stone can be ​split off by ​forcing wedges between the ​layers. [C] a ​piece of something, ​especiallyfood, in the ​shape of a ​triangle: Auntie Ann put a ​huge wedge of ​cake on my ​plate. a wedge of ​cheese

wedge noun (SHOES)

wedges [plural] women's ​shoes with a heel all the way under the ​shoe

wedgeverb [T]

uk   us   /wedʒ/
to make something ​stay in a ​particularposition by using a wedge: [+ adj] Find something to wedge the ​window open/​closed with. to put something into a very ​small or ​narrowspace, so that it cannot ​moveeasily: Her ​shoe came off and got wedged between the ​bars. I was ​standingwaiting for a ​bus, wedged between (= ​fixed between and ​unable to ​move away from) two ​oldladies and ​theirbags of ​shopping.
(Definition of wedge from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"wedge" in American English

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wedgenoun [C]

 us   /wedʒ/
a ​piece of ​wood, ​metal, or other ​material with a ​pointededge at one end and a ​wideedge at the other, used to ​keep two things ​apart or, when ​forced between two things, to ​break them ​apart: A wedge under the ​doorkept it ​open.
verb [T]  us   /wedʒ/
He wedged the ​windowopen with a ​screwdriver.
(Definition of wedge from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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