welcome Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Meaning of “welcome” in the English Dictionary

"welcome" in British English

See all translations

welcomeverb [T]

uk   us   /ˈwel.kəm/

welcome verb [T] (ENCOURAGE)

B2 to be ​pleased about and ​encourage or ​support something: The new ​appointment has been ​widely welcomed.
More examples

welcome verb [T] (MEET)

B1 to ​meet and ​speak to someone in a ​friendly way when they ​arrive: The ​visitors were warmly welcomed by the ​head of the ​department. Browning ​stood at the ​door, welcoming ​newcomers with a ​largesmile and a ​pat on the ​arm. Please welcome (= ​pleaseclap for)ourguest of ​honour, George Taylor.
More examples

welcomeadjective

uk   us   /ˈwel.kəm/

welcome adjective (MEETING)

B1 If someone is welcome, you are ​pleased when they ​visit you: Come and ​see us ​whenever you're in ​town - you're always welcome/you'll always be welcome. Their ​tradition is that the ​traveller is a welcome guest.make sb welcome B1 to show someone that you are ​pleased that they are with you: The ​restaurant makes ​children very welcome.
More examples

welcome adjective (PLEASED)

B2 If something is welcome, you are ​pleased to have or do it: The ​holiday was a welcome change/​break/​relief. She ​offered him the welcome chance/​opportunity to do something different. A ​nicecup of ​tea would be very welcome.be welcome to do sth B1 used to ​tell someone that they can ​certainly do something: Anyone who is ​interested is welcome to come along.

welcomenoun

uk   us   /ˈwel.kəm/

welcome noun (MEETING)

B1 [C or U] the way in which someone is ​met and ​spoken to when they ​arrive in a ​place: They were given a warm (= very ​friendly) welcome. The ​leader of the ​politicalprotestsreturned to a hero's/heroine's welcome after seven ​years in ​exile. She referred to his ​previousvisit in her speech of welcome/welcome speech.outstay your welcome C2 mainly UK (US usually overstay your welcome) to ​stay too ​long: I ​left after two ​days - I didn't ​want to ​outstay my welcome.
More examples

welcome noun (REACTION)

[S] a ​reaction to a ​decision or ​suggestion: Their ​supporters gave the ​decision a ​guarded/​cautious welcome.

welcomeexclamation

uk   us   /ˈwel.kəm/
A2 said as a ​greeting to someone ​arriving at a ​place: Welcome - ​please come in. Welcome home/back - we've ​missed you! Welcome to Cambridge.
More examples
(Definition of welcome from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"welcome" in American English

See all translations

welcomeverb [T]

 us   /ˈwel·kəm/

welcome verb [T] (MEET)

to ​meet or ​speak to someone in a ​friendly way when that ​person comes to the ​place where you are: We went next ​door to welcome ​our new ​neighbors. The ​primeminister of Canada welcomed the ​presidentwarmly.

welcome verb [T] (SUPPORT)

to be ​pleased about or ​support something: Baseball ​fans welcomed the end of the ​players’ ​strike. She welcomed the ​opportunity to ​explain herself.
welcome
noun [C]  us   /ˈwel·kəm/
We were given a ​warm welcome.

welcomeadjective

 us   /ˈwel·kəm/

welcome adjective (SUPPORTED)

"You’re welcome" is a ​politeanswer when someone ​thanks you: "Thanks for taking ​care of ​ourcat." "You’re welcome."

welcome adjective (MET)

(of someone who ​visits) ​received in a ​friendly way: You’ll always be welcome here.
(Definition of welcome from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of welcome?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website
Word of the Day

conker

the shiny brown poisonous nut of a horse chestnut tree

Word of the Day

Meerkat meme
Meerkat meme
by Colin McIntosh,
September 03, 2015
Meerkats are not new to popular culture (they appear in the folk tales of the San people of the Kalahari), but their arrival in the public’s consciousness, at least in the UK and the US, is a relatively recent phenomenon. Meerkats are small, sociable Southern African mammals that live in large family

Read More 

parklet noun
parklet noun
August 31, 2015
a public outdoor space that may be associated with a local business but where anyone can sit Pop-up cafes in NY are what’s actually called parklets in many other places around the country.

Read More