whack Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Meaning of “whack” in the English Dictionary

"whack" in British English

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whackverb

uk   us   /wæk/
[T] to ​hit someone or something ​noisily: He whacked the ​treetrunk with his ​stick. She whacked him in the ​mouth. [T + adv/prep] UK informal to ​quickly put something ​somewhere: "Where shall I put my ​bag?" "Just whack it in the ​corner there."

whacknoun

uk   us   /wæk/
  • whack noun (SHARE)

[S or U] UK informal a ​share or ​part: Low ​earners will ​pay only ​half the ​charge but high ​earners will have to payfull whack (= ​pay the ​wholeamount). That's not a fair whack.take a whack (at sth) US informal to ​try to do something: Take a whack at the ​homework, then ​ask for ​help if you need it.top whack UK informal the ​highestpossibleprice or ​payment: They're ​prepared to ​paytop whack for ​goods like this.
(Definition of whack from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"whack" in American English

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whackverb [T]

 us   /hwæk, wæk/
to give someone or something a hard, ​noisyhit: He whacked his ​newspaper on the back of the ​chair as he ​talked.
whack
noun [C]  us   /hwæk, wæk/
She ​gripped her ​racket with both ​hands and gave the ​ball a hard whack.
(Definition of whack from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Translations of “whack”
in Spanish pegar, zurrar…
in Vietnamese đánh đau…
in Malaysian memukul…
in Thai ตีอย่างแรง…
in French donner un grand coup (à)…
in German vermöbeln…
in Chinese (Simplified) 猛打,猛击,重击, 迅速放置, 随意丢放…
in Turkish çarpmak, dövmek, yumruk indirmek…
in Russian ударять…
in Indonesian menampar…
in Chinese (Traditional) 猛打,猛擊,重擊, 迅速放置, 隨意丟放…
in Polish walnąć…
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“whack” in American English

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