whip Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
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Meaning of “whip” in the English Dictionary

"whip" in British English

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whipnoun

uk   /wɪp/  us   /wɪp/
  • whip noun (POLITICS)

[C] (in many elected political systems) a member of a political party in a parliament or in the legislature whose job is to make certain that other party members are present at voting time and also to make certain that they vote in a particular way: Hargreaves is the MP who got into trouble with his party's chief whip for opposing the tax reform.
[C] in British politics, a written order ordering that party members be present in parliament when there is to be an important vote, or that they vote in a particular way: In 1970 he defied the three-line (= most urgent) whip against EC membership.
  • whip noun (SWEET FOOD)

[C or U] UK a sweet food made from cream or beaten egg mixed together with fruit
  • whip noun (CAR)

[C] slang a car: Do you have the whip today, or are we walking?

whipverb

uk   /wɪp/  us   /wɪp/ (-pp-)
  • whip verb (DO QUICKLY)

[T usually + adv/prep] to bring or take something quickly: She whipped a handkerchief out of her pocket and wiped his face. He whipped the covers off the bed. I was going to pay but before I knew it he'd whipped out his credit card. They whipped my plate away before I'd even finished.
[I or T, + adv/prep] literary to (cause something to) move quickly and forcefully: The wind whipped across the half-frozen lake. A fierce, freezing wind whipped torrential rain into their faces.
(Definition of whip from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"whip" in American English

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whipnoun [C]

 us   /hwɪp, wɪp/
  • whip noun [C] (STRAP)

a piece of leather or rope fastened to a stick, used to train and control animals or, esp. in the past, to hit people: The trainer cracked his whip, and the lions sat in a circle.
  • whip noun [C] (POLITICS)

an elected representative of a political party in a legislature whose job is to gather support from other legislators (= law makers) for particular legislation and to encourage them to vote the way their party wants them to

whipverb

 us   /hwɪp, wɪp/ (-pp-)
  • whip verb (MOVE QUICKLY)

[always + adv/prep] to bring or take (something) quickly, or to move quickly: [M] They whipped my plate away before I’d even finished. [M] Bill whipped out his harmonica. [I] The wind whipped around the corner of the building.
  • whip verb (BEAT FOOD)

[T] to beat cream, eggs, potatoes, etc., with a special utensil in order to make it thick and soft: I still need to whip the cream for the pie.
  • whip verb (STRAP)

[T] to hit a person with a whip, esp. for punishment, or to hit an animal with a whip in order to control it or make it move more quickly: To train them, owners often whip their pit bulls. fig. Dallas whipped Buffalo 52 to 17 (= beat them by this score).
(Definition of whip from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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