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Meaning of “wild” in the English Dictionary

"wild" in British English

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wildadjective

uk   /waɪld/ us   /waɪld/
  • wild adjective (NOT CONTROLLED)

B2 uncontrolled, violent, or extreme: a wild party wild dancing The audience burst into wild applause. When I told him what I'd done, he went wild (= became very angry). The children were wild with excitement (= were extremely excited). Her eyes were wild/She had a wild look in her eyes (= her eyes were wide open, as if frightened or mentally ill). His hair was wild (= long and untidy) and his clothes full of holes. There have been wild (= extreme) variations in the level of spending. They get some wild weather (= many severe storms) in the north. It was a wild (= stormy or very windy) night, with the wind howling and the rain pouring down.
slang very unusual, often in a way that is attractive or exciting: Those are wild trousers you're wearing, Maddy.

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wildness
noun [U] uk   /ˈwaɪld.nəs/ us   /ˈwaɪld.nəs/
the wildness (= natural and extreme beauty) of the Western Highlands

wildnoun

uk   /waɪld/ us   /waɪld/
in the wild
in natural conditions, independent of humans: Animals would produce more young in the wild than they do in the zoo.
in the wilds (of somewhere)
in an area that is far from where people usually live and difficult to get to, and that is not considered easy to live in: She lives somewhere in the wilds of Borneo.
(Definition of wild from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"wild" in American English

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wildadjective, adverb [-er/-est only]

us   /wɑɪld/
living or growing independently of people, in natural conditions, and with natural characteristics: wild turkeys These herbs grow wild.

wildadjective [-er/-est only]

us   /wɑɪld/
extreme or violent and not controlled: He led a wild life. When I told him what I’d done, he went wild (= became angry). I’ll make a wild guess (= one not based on careful thought).
slang Wild also means excellent, special, or unusual: The music they play is just wild.
Your wildest dreams are your hopes or thoughts about the best things that could happen in your future: Never in my wildest dreams did I think I’d win.

wildnoun [U]

us   /wɑɪld/
  • wild noun [U] (NATURAL)

places that have few towns or roads, are difficult to get to, and lack conveniences: In Kenya we saw elephants and lions in the wild.
(Definition of wild from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
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by Liz Walter Enough is a very common word, but it is easy to make mistakes with it. You need to be careful about its position in a sentence, and the prepositions or verb patterns that come after it. I’ll start with the position of enough in the sentence. When we use it with a noun,

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