wild Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Meaning of “wild” in the English Dictionary

"wild" in British English

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wildadjective

uk   us   /waɪld/
  • wild adjective (NOT CONTROLLED)

B2 uncontrolled, ​violent, or ​extreme: a wild ​party wild ​dancing The ​audienceburst into wild ​applause. When I told him what I'd done, he went wild (= ​became very ​angry). The ​children were wild withexcitement (= were ​extremelyexcited). Her ​eyes were wild/She had a wild ​look in her ​eyes (= her ​eyes were ​wideopen, as if ​frightened or ​mentallyill). His ​hair was wild (= ​long and ​untidy) and his ​clothesfull of ​holes. There have been wild (= ​extreme)variations in the ​level of ​spending. They get some wild ​weather (= many ​severestorms) in the ​north. It was a wild (= ​stormy or very ​windy)night, with the ​windhowling and the ​rainpouring down. slang very ​unusual, often in a way that is ​attractive or ​exciting: Those are wild ​trousers you're ​wearing, Maddy.

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  • wild adjective (NATURAL)

A2 used to refer to ​plants or ​animals that ​live or ​growindependently of ​people, in ​naturalconditions and with ​naturalcharacteristics: wild ​grasses a ​herd of wild ​horses These ​herbsgrow wild in the ​area.B2 Wild ​land is not used to ​growcrops and has few ​peopleliving in it: a wild, ​mountainousregion

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wildness
noun [U] uk   us   /ˈwaɪld.nəs/
the wildness (= ​natural and ​extremebeauty) of the ​Western Highlands

wildnoun

uk   us   /waɪld/
in the wild in ​naturalconditions, ​independent of ​humans: Animals would ​produce more ​young in the wild than they do in the ​zoo.in the wilds (of somewhere) in an ​area that is ​far from where ​people usually ​live and ​difficult to get to, and that is not ​consideredeasy to ​live in: She ​livessomewhere in the wilds of Borneo.
(Definition of wild from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"wild" in American English

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wildadjective, adverb [-er/-est only]

 us   /wɑɪld/
living or ​growingindependently of ​people, in ​naturalconditions, and with ​natural characteristics: wild ​turkeys These ​herbsgrow wild.

wildadjective [-er/-est only]

 us   /wɑɪld/
extreme or ​violent and not ​controlled: He ​led a wild ​life. When I told him what I’d done, he went wild (= ​becameangry). I’ll make a wild ​guess (= one not ​based on ​carefulthought). slang Wild also ​meansexcellent, ​special, or ​unusual: The ​music they ​play is just wild. Your wildest ​dreams are ​yourhopes or ​thoughts about the ​best things that could ​happen in ​yourfuture: Never in my wildest ​dreams did I ​think I’d ​win.

wildnoun [U]

 us   /wɑɪld/
  • wild noun [U] (NATURAL)

places that have few ​towns or ​roads, are ​difficult to get to, and ​lackconveniences: In Kenya we ​sawelephants and ​lions in the wild.
(Definition of wild from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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