Meaning of “wind up” in the English Dictionary

"wind up" in British English

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wind-upnoun [ C usually singular ]

uk /ˈwaɪnd.ʌp/ us /ˈwaɪnd.ʌp/ UK informal

something that is not true that you tell someone in order to make a joke:

You can't be serious - is this a wind-up?

wind-upadjective [ before noun ]

/ˈwaɪnd.ʌp/ /ˈwaɪnd.ʌp/

(Definition of “wind up” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"wind up" in American English

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wind up

/ˈwɑɪndˈʌp/
phrasal verb with wind us /wɑɪnd/ verb past tense and past participle wound /wɑʊnd/

(BECOME)

to come to be in a particular situation or condition, esp. a bad one:

If you aren’t careful lifting weights, you could wind up hurting yourself.

(Definition of “wind up” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"wind up" in Business English

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wind up

phrasal verb with wind uk /waɪnd/ us verb wound, wound

[ T ] LAW to close a business, especially when it is not successful and has debts:

The company was wound up in February with debts of $5.2 million.

[ I or T ] to end a meeting, discussion, or an activity:

We need to start winding up now as someone else has booked the meeting room.
They announced that they would be winding up the negotiations today.
See also

wind-upnoun [ C ]

uk us MANAGEMENT, LAW

the process of formally ending the existence of a company, usually because it is bankrupt:

The firm collapsed and a wind-up order was given.

(Definition of “wind up” from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)