withdrawal Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “withdrawal” in the English Dictionary

"withdrawal" in British English

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withdrawalnoun

uk   /wɪðˈdrɔː.əl/  us   /-ˈdrɑː-/

withdrawal noun (TAKING OUT)

C2 [C or U] when you take ​money out of a ​bankaccount: The ​bankbecamesuspicious after several ​large withdrawals were made from his ​account in a ​singleweek. [C or U] the ​process or ​action of a ​militaryforcemoving out of an ​area: The ​commander-in-chief was given 36 ​hours to ​secure a withdrawal of his ​troops from the ​combatzone.
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withdrawal noun (NOT AVAILABLE)

C2 [U] the ​act or ​process of taking something away so that it is no ​longeravailable, or of someone ​stopping being ​involved in an ​activity: Doctors ​demanded the withdrawal of the ​drug (from the ​market) after several ​cases of ​dangerous side-effects were ​reported. Her ​sudden withdrawal from the ​championshipcaused a lot of ​pressspeculation about her ​health.

withdrawal noun (NO CONTACT)

[U] behaviour in which someone ​prefers to be ​alone and does not ​want to ​talk to other ​people: Withdrawal is a ​classicsymptom of ​depression.
(Definition of withdrawal from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"withdrawal" in American English

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withdrawalnoun [C/U]

 us   /wɪθˈdrɔ·əl, wɪð-/
an ​act of taking something back, ​removing something, or ​moving something back: [C] a ​troop withdrawal [C] He had made several ​large withdrawals from his ​bankaccount (= He had taken out a lot of ​money). [C] Her ​sudden withdrawal from the ​competitionsurprised everyone. Withdrawal also ​means the ​physical and ​mentaleffectsexperienced when a ​personstops using a ​drug.
(Definition of withdrawal from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"withdrawal" in Business English

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withdrawalnoun [C or U]

uk   us   /wɪðˈdrɔːəl/
BANKING, FINANCE the ​act of taking ​money out of an ​account, or the ​amount of ​money taken: The ​savingsaccount only ​allows you to make three withdrawals a ​year. There's a cash withdrawallimit of €500 ​per day. There are large early withdrawal ​penaltiesattached to this ​mortgage.
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[U] the ​act of ​stopping something from ​happening or being ​available: withdrawal of sth The withdrawal of ​corporatesponsorship had a ​damagingimpact on the company's ​performance. withdrawal of an ​offer/​support
[U] COMMERCE the ​process of ​removing a ​product from the ​market, either temporarily or permanently, because there is a problem with it: The ​company is still ​struggling to ​rebuild its ​imagefollowing the withdrawal of its new cancer ​drug on ​safetygrounds. The ​cost of the product withdrawal was ​estimated at over $10 million.
[U] the ​state of no ​longer being involved in something: withdrawal from sth The ​scandalled to her withdrawal from ​politics.
[U] the ​act of ​officiallychanging something you previously said: withdrawal of an ​allegation/​statement/​complaint
(Definition of withdrawal from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“withdrawal” in Business English

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