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Meaning of “worry” in the English Dictionary

"worry" in British English

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worryverb

uk   /ˈwʌr.i/ us   /ˈwɝː.i/
  • worry verb (PROBLEM)

A2 [I] to think about problems or unpleasant things that might happen in a way that makes you feel unhappy and frightened: Try not to worry - there's nothing you can do to change the situation. Don't worry, she'll be all right. It's silly worrying about things which are outside your control. [+ (that)] She's worried (that) she might not be able to find another job.
B2 [T] to make someone feel unhappy and frightened because of problems or unpleasant things that might happen: You worried your mother by not writing. [+ that] It worries me that he hasn't phoned yet. The continued lack of rain is starting to worry people.

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  • worry verb (ANIMAL)

[T] If a dog worries another animal, it chases and frightens it and might also bite it: Any dog caught worrying sheep in these fields will be shot.
Phrasal verbs

worrynoun

uk   /ˈwʌr.i/ us   /ˈwɝː.i/
B1 [C] a problem that makes you feel unhappy and frightened: health/financial worries Keeping warm in the winter is a major worry for many old people.
B2 [C or U] a feeling of being unhappy and frightened about something: Unemployment, bad health - all sorts of things can be a cause of worry. It was clear that Anna had no worries about her husband's attempts to flirt.

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no worries
used to tell someone that a situation is acceptable, even if something has gone wrong: "Oh, I'm sorry I got your name wrong!" "No worries".
(Definition of worry from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"worry" in American English

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worryverb [I/T]

us   /ˈwɜr·i, ˈwʌr·i/
to think about problems or unpleasant things that make you anxious, or to make someone feel anxious: [I] If you get a monthly train ticket, you won’t have to worry about buying a ticket every day. [I] My mother always worries about me when I don’t come home by midnight. [I] "Will you be all right walking home?" "Don’t worry – I’ll be fine." [+ that clause] She worried that she might not be able to find another job. [T] A lot of things worried him about his roommate.
worry
noun [C/U] us   /ˈwɜr·i, ˈwʌr·i/
[C] Fortunately, right now we don’t have any worries about money.
(Definition of worry from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“worry” in British English

“worry” in American English

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