Meaning of “wreck” in the English Dictionary

"wreck" in British English

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wreckverb [ T ]

uk /rek/ us /rek/

wrecknoun [ C ]

uk /rek/ us /rek/

C2 a vehicle or ship that has been destroyed or badly damaged:

Divers exploring the wreck managed to salvage some coins and jewellery.
The burned-out wrecks of two police cars littered the road.

C2 informal someone who is in bad physical or mental condition:

The stress she had been under at work reduced her to a nervous/quivering wreck.

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(Definition of “wreck” from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"wreck" in American English

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wreckverb [ T ]

us /rek/

to destroy or badly damage something:

The explosion wrecked one house and shattered nearby windows.
A prison record would wreck his chances of becoming a lawyer.

wrecknoun [ C ]

us /rek/

a vehicle or ship that has been destroyed or badly damaged

A wreck can also be something that is badly in need of repair:

We bought this old wreck of a house and fixed it up.

A person who is described as a wreck is in bad physical or mental condition:

Coping with three kids and a mother in the hospital, she’s a nervous wreck.

(Definition of “wreck” from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"wreck" in Business English

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wreckverb [ T ]

uk /rek/ us

to destroy or badly damage something:

Several protesters set out to wreck the company's headquarters.

to spoil a chance, plan, etc.:

be wrecked by sth The deal was wrecked by the recent turmoil in the debt markets.
Backbenchers were accused of plotting to wreck the government's plans.

wrecknoun [ C ]

uk /rek/ us

something that has been destroyed or badly damaged:

The property is a wreck.

(Definition of “wreck” from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)