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Meaning of “year” in the English Dictionary

"year" in British English

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yearnoun

uk   /jɪər/  us   /jɪr/
A1 [C] a ​period of twelve ​months, ​especially from 1 ​January to 31 ​December: Annette ​worked in Italy for two years. 2005 was one of the ​worst years of my ​life. We went to Egypt on ​holiday last year. At this time of year the ​beaches are ​almostdeserted. This ​specieskeepsitsleaves all year (round) (= through the year).
[C] a ​period of twelve ​monthsrelating to a ​particularactivity: The financial/​tax year ​begins in ​April.
A2 [C] the ​part of the year, in a ​school or ​university, during which ​courses are ​taught: the ​academic/​school yearUK She's now in her ​final/first/second year at Manchester University.US My ​daughter is in her freshman/​sophomore/​junior/​senior year.
[C, + sing/pl verb] UK (US class) a ​group of ​students who ​startschool, ​college, ​university, or a ​course together: Kathy was in the year above me at ​college.

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-yearsuffix

uk   / -jɪər/  us   / -jɪr/ UK
used to refer to a ​student in a ​particularyeargroup at a ​school, ​college, or ​university: I like ​teaching the first-years, but the second-years can be ​difficult. a first-year ​student
(Definition of year from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"year" in American English

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yearnoun [C]

 us   /jɪər/
any ​period of twelve ​months, or a ​particularperiod of twelve ​monthsbeginning with ​January 1: last/next year She ​brought along her eight-year-old ​daughter. My ​parents have been ​married for 30 years. Richard ​earned his ​degree in the year 1995. You can get ​cheaperfares now, so it’s a good ​time of year to ​travelabroad.
In a ​school, a year refers to the ​part of the year during which ​courses are ​taught: September is the ​start of the new ​academic year.
(Definition of year from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"year" in Business English

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yearnoun [C]

uk   us   /jɪər/
(also calendar year) a ​period of 365 or 366 days, ​starting on January 1st and ​ending on December 31st: The ​project took five years to complete. last/next/this year the ​following/previous year
a ​period of twelve months ​relating to a particular ​activity: He ​earns $68,000 a year.
years
a ​longtime: It's taken years to get ​funding for the ​project. He's been doing the same ​job for years.
of the year
a thing or ​person of the year is one that has been chosen as the best in a particular ​area or ​activity for that year: She ​won the Business Woman of the Year ​award in 2010.
year after year
every year for a ​longperiod: The ​fundproduces terrific ​results year after year.
year by year
if something ​increases, develops, etc. year by year, it ​happens each year over a ​period of ​time: Savers should ​monitor their ​funds year by year. Credit ​cardfraud is still ​increasing on a year-by-year ​basis.
year in, year out
if something ​happens year in, year out, it has been ​happening for a while and is expected to continue in the same way: Investors should choose a ​fund that does consistently well year in, year out.
(Definition of year from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“year” in British English

“year” in Business English

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