yield Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
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Meaning of “yield” in the English Dictionary

"yield" in British English

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yieldverb

uk   us   /jiːld/

yield verb (PRODUCE)

C2 [T] to ​supply or ​produce something ​positive such as a ​profit, an ​amount of ​food or ​information: an ​attempt to yield ​increasedprofits The ​investigation yielded some ​unexpectedresults. Favourable ​weather yielded a good ​crop.
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yield verb (GIVE UP)

[I or T] to give up the ​control of or ​responsibility for something, often because you have been ​forced to: They were ​forced to yield (up)theirland to the ​occupyingforces. Despite ​renewedpressure to give up the ​occupiedterritory, they will not yield.
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yield verb (BEND/BREAK)

[I] formal to ​bend or ​break under ​pressure: His ​legsbegan to yield under the ​sheerweight of his ​body.

yield verb (STOP)

[I] US (UK give way) to ​stop in ​order to ​allow other ​vehicles to go past, ​especially before you ​drive onto a ​biggerroad: If you're going ​downhill, you need to yield tobikers going ​uphill.
Phrasal verbs

yieldnoun [C usually plural]

uk   us   /jiːld/
an ​amount of something ​positive, such as ​food or ​profit, that is ​produced or ​supplied: Crop yields have ​risensteadily. Yields on ​gas and ​electricityshares are ​consistently high.
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(Definition of yield from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"yield" in American English

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yieldverb

 us   /jild/

yield verb (PRODUCE)

[T] to ​supply or ​produce something ​positive such as a ​profit, an ​amount of ​food, or ​information: Some ​mutualfunds are ​currently yielding 15% on new ​moneyinvested. [T] If something yields ​information, it ​provides it: A ​letterfound by the ​FBI last ​week may yield new ​clues.

yield verb (GIVE UP)

[I/T] to give up the ​control of or ​responsibility for something, often because you have been ​forced to: [T] to yield ​power [I/T] If you yield to something, you ​accept that you have been ​defeated by it: [I] It’s ​easy to yield to the ​temptation to ​borrow a lot of ​money. [I/T] To yield to ​traffic coming from another ​direction is to ​wait and ​allow it to go first.

yieldnoun [C usually pl]

 us   /jild/

yield noun [C usually pl] (PRODUCE)

a ​profit or an ​amount esp. of a ​cropproduced: Over the past 50 ​years, ​crop yields have ​risensteadily in the US.
(Definition of yield from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)

"yield" in Business English

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yieldnoun [C or U]

uk   us   /jiːld/
FINANCE the ​totalamount of ​profit or ​incomeproduced from a ​business or ​investment: The bond's yield ​fell to 6.09%.high/low yield These securities are ​speculative and may involve greater ​risks and have ​higher yields.an increase/reduction in yield The ​payout on a 25-year ​policy is ​reduced to £100,271, which ​represents a ​reduction in yield from 13.3% to 13%. a 30-day/30-year yield
PRODUCTION the ​totalamount of a ​crop, ​product, etc. that is ​produced or ​supplied: Over a 15-year ​period, the ​average yield of dairy cows in the UK had ​increased by 34%. These salts continuously bombard ​agricultural soils, ​stressingplants and ​reducing crop yields.
MONEY the ​averageamount of ​money that an airline receives from each ​passenger for each ​mile they ​travel or that a ​hotel receives from each ​guest for each night they ​stay: Yield ​management is not really new to ​hoteliers, since identical ​rooms have been ​sold for ​higherprices during high ​season and for ​lowerprices during ​lowseason for ​generations.

yieldverb [T]

uk   us   /jiːld/
FINANCE to ​supply or ​produce a ​profit, ​income, etc.: The ​stake, ​analysts say, could yield $700m a ​year in ​revenue. British ​sharescurrently yield 3.3%.yield profit/returns Even the most unglamorous ​sectors of the ​market can yield ​bigreturns.
PRODUCTION to ​supply or ​produce a ​crop, ​product, etc.: Oil ​fields and ​reserves are yielding more ​oil than had been ​thought possible, because of ​technologicaladvances.
to ​supply or ​produceinformation, ​results, etc.: yield benefits/information/results Subsequent ​producttests yielded better ​results. His ​emails to ​companyexecutives yielded no ​response.
(Definition of yield from the Cambridge Business English Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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“yield” in Business English

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