zap Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary

Meaning of “zap” in the English Dictionary

"zap" in British English

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uk   us   /zæp/ (-pp-)

zap verb (DESTROY)

[T] informal to get ​rid of or ​kill something or someone, ​especiallyintentionally: They have the ​kind of ​weapons that can zap the ​enemy from thousands of ​miles away.figurative We're really going to zap the ​competition with this new ​product!

zap verb (GO QUICKLY)

[I or T, usually + adv/prep] UK informal to go ​somewhere or do something ​quickly: Have I got ​time to zap into ​town and do some ​shopping? George zapped through his ​homework and ​rushed out to ​playbasketball. There are now over a million American ​faxmachines zapping (= ​sendingquickly)messages from ​coast to ​coast.
See also
[I usually + adv/prep] informal to use an ​electronicdevice to ​changetelevision channelsquickly, sometimes to ​avoidwatchingadvertisements
[T] informal to ​cook something in a microwave: Don't ​bakepotatoes in the ​oven, zap them in the ​microwave - ​dinner in 10 ​minutes!

zapnoun [U]

uk   us   /zæp/ mainly US informal
an ​electricshock or something ​similar: The ​device gives ​coldbatteries a zap of ​energy to ​bring them back to ​life. The zap is as ​strong as an ​electric eel's.
(Definition of zap from the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary & Thesaurus © Cambridge University Press)

"zap" in American English

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zapverb [T]

 us   /zæp/ (-pp-) infml

zap verb [T] (DESTROY)

to ​destroy or ​attack something ​suddenly, esp. with ​electricity, radiation , or another ​form of ​energy: The ​salon uses ​lasers to zap ​unwantedhair. To zap something is also to ​cook or ​heat it in a microwave : Do you ​want that meatloaf ​cold, or should I zap it?

zap verb [T] (GO QUICKLY)

to move something ​quickly: You can zap ​filesstraight to the ​printer from a ​PDA or ​laptop.
(Definition of zap from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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