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Cambridge Essential English Dictionary

With short definitions that are easy to understand, this monolingual dictionary is suitable for beginners and pre-intermediate students.

Cambridge Essential English Dictionary has all the words and phrases that you need to learn in British English. Select "Essential British English" from the list of dictionaries at the top of any page on Cambridge Dictionaries Online to search this dictionary.

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Simple definitions using the words that you know.

See which words to learn first

English Profile symbols tell you the level of the most important words in English: At about, the first sense is marked A1, which tells you that this is a very important sense. The phrase what about/how about has two senses marked A2 and B1 that are important for more advanced users.

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Thousands of short, natural example sentences: At able, the example shows how to use be able to, as these are words which are often used together.

British English Pronunciation

Hear the words spoken online with thousands of British English recordings: Try listening to the two different pronunciations for the verb record and the noun record.

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  • 600 pictures
  • 16-page 'Guide to the Dictionary' with exercises for use in class or at home.
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  • 'Essential Phrasal Verbs' section gives extra help with phrasal verbs.

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There, their and they’re – which one should you use?
There, their and they’re – which one should you use?
by ,
April 27, 2016
by Liz Walter If you are a learner of English and you are confused about the words there, their and they’re, let me reassure you: many, many people with English as their first language share your problem! You only have to take a look at the ‘comments’ sections on the website of, for example, a popular

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Word of the Day

nutty

containing, tasting of, or similar to nuts

Word of the Day

bio-banding noun
bio-banding noun
April 25, 2016
in sport, grouping children according to their physical maturity rather than their age ‘When we’re grouping children for sports, we do it by age groups, but the problem is that, within those age groups, we get huge variations in biological age,’ said Dr Sean Cumming, senior lecturer at the University of Bath’s department for

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