go verb Meaning in the Cambridge Essential English Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
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Meaning of "go" in Essential English Dictionary

go

verb   /ɡəʊ/ (going, went, gone)
A1 to move or travel somewhere: I’d love to go to Florida. We went into the house. Are you going by train?
A1 to move or travel somewhere in order to do something: Let’s go for a walk.
go running, swimming, etc.
A2 to go somewhere to do a particular activity: We went skating yesterday.
be going to do/be something
A2 to intend to do or be something: I’m going to call her tonight. I’m going to be a dancer when I grow up.
be going to do something
A2 used to say that something is expected to happen in the future: It’s going to snow tonight.
go badly, well, etc.
B1 to happen in a particular way: My exams went really well.
B1 to disappear or no longer exist: When I turned round, the man had gone.
B1 If a road, path, etc. goes in a particular direction, it leads there: This road goes to Birmingham.
go bald, blind, etc.
B1 to become bald, blind, etc.: He went bald when he was thirty.
B1 If two things go, they match each other: Does the jacket go with the trousers?
to work correctly: I managed to get the car going.
to stop working correctly: She’s very old and her hearing is going.
to have a particular tune or words: I can’t remember how that song goes.
If time goes, it passes: The day went very quickly.
to make a particular sound or movement: A cow goes “moo”.
to go
mainly US If you ask for food to go in a restaurant, you are asking for food that you can take away: I would like a burger and French fries to go.
(Definition of go verb from the Cambridge Essential Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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