account Meaning in the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Meaning of “account” - Learner’s Dictionary

account

noun [C]     /əˈkaʊnt/
REPORT B2 a written or spoken description of something that has happened: They gave conflicting accounts of the events. The documents provide a detailed account of the town's early history.Accounts and storiesSummaries and summarisingDescribing and telling stories
BANK ( also bank account) B1 an arrangement with a bank to keep your money there and to let you take it out when you need to: I paid the money into my account.AccountingBanks and bank accounts
SHOP an agreement with a shop or company that allows you to buy things and pay for them laterBorrowing, lending and debtPaying and spending money
take sth into account; take account of sth B2 to consider something when judging a situation: You have to take into account the fact that he is less experienced when judging his performance.Thinking and contemplating
on account of sth formal B2 because of something: He doesn't drink alcohol on account of his health.Connecting words which introduce a cause or reason
by all accounts as said by a lot of people: The party was, by all accounts, a great success.Quoting and making references
on my account just for or because of me: Please don't change your plans on my account.Connecting words which introduce a cause or reason
on no account; not on any account UK not for any reason or in any situation: On no account must these records be changed. →  See also checking account , current account , deposit account Always and never
(Definition of account from the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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