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English definition of “advantage”

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advantage

noun [C, U]
 
 
/ədˈvɑːntɪdʒ/
USEFUL THING B1 something good about a situation that helps you: One of the advantages of living in town is having the shops so near.Advantage and disadvantageUseful or advantageous
SUCCESS B2 something that will help you to succeed: These new routes will give the airline a considerable advantage over its competitors. By half time we had a 2-0 advantage (= were winning by two points). If we could start early it would be to our advantage (= help us to succeed). →  Opposite disadvantage Advantage and disadvantage
take advantage of sth B1 to use the good things in a situation: I thought I'd take advantage of the sports facilities while I'm here.Using and misusing
take advantage of sb/sth B2 to treat someone badly in order to get what you wantTreating people or animals badlyInsults and abuseUnkind, cruel and unfeelingViolent or aggressive
Translations of “advantage”
in Korean 이점…
in Arabic مَنفَعة…
in French avantage…
in Turkish avantaj, üstünlük…
in Italian vantaggio…
in Chinese (Traditional) 有利條件,有利因素, 優勢, 好處…
in Russian преимущество…
in Polish korzyść, zaleta, przewaga…
in Spanish ventaja…
in Portuguese vantagem…
in German der Vorteil…
in Catalan avantatge…
in Japanese 利点, 有利な点, 強み…
in Chinese (Simplified) 有利条件,有利因素, 优势, 好处…
(Definition of advantage from the Cambridge Learners Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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