along adverb Meaning in the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
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Meaning of “along” - Learner’s Dictionary

along

adverb     /əˈlɒŋ/
B1 forward: We were just walking along, chatting.Direction of motionPoints of the compass
be/come along
to arrive somewhere: You wait ages for a bus and then three come along at once.Arriving, entering and invading
bring/take sb along
B1 to take someone with you to a place: She asked if she could bring some friends along to the party.Taking someone somewhere or telling them the way
along with sb/sth
B2 in addition to someone or something else: California along with Florida is probably the most popular American holiday destination.Acting, being or existing together
Translations of “along”
in Arabic إلى الأمام…
in Korean 앞으로…
in Malaysian datang, bersama…
in French ici, là, avec…
in Turkish ileriye, öne doğru…
in Italian avanti…
in Chinese (Traditional) 向前…
in Russian вперед…
in Polish przed siebie…
in Vietnamese cùng đến, đi theo…
in Spanish aquí, junto, consigo…
in Portuguese para a frente…
in Thai ไปยัง, ด้วย…
in German nach, mit…
in Catalan cap endavant…
in Japanese 前方へ…
in Indonesian datang, bersama…
in Chinese (Simplified) 向前…
(Definition of along adverb from the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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