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Meaning of “around” - Learner’s Dictionary

around

adverb, preposition     /əˈraʊnd/
IN A CIRCLE ( also UK round)
A2 on all sides of something: They sat around the table. He put his arms around her waist.General location and orientationSomewhere, anywhere, nowhere, or everywhereEnclosing, surrounding and immersing
DIRECTION ( also UK round)
B1 to the opposite direction: He turned around and looked at her.General words for movement
CIRCULAR MOVEMENT ( also UK round)
A2 in a circular movement: This lever turns the wheels around.Bending, twisting and curvingGeneral words for movement
ALONG OUTSIDE ( also UK round)
along the outside of something, not through it: You have to walk around the house to get to the garden.General location and orientationFrom, out and outside
TO A PLACE ( also UK round)
A2 to or in different parts of a place: She showed me around the museum. I spent a year travelling around Australia.Somewhere, anywhere, nowhere, or everywhereGeneral words for movement
SEVERAL PLACES ( also UK round)
B1 from one place or person to another: She passed a plate of sandwiches around. There's a virus going around the school.General words for movement
HERE
B2 here, or near this place: Is Roger around?General location and orientationSomewhere, anywhere, nowhere, or everywhere
EXISTING
present or available: Mobile phones have been around for years now.PresentAvailable and accessibleUnavailable and inaccessible
APPROXIMATELY
A2 used before a number or amount to mean 'approximately': around four o'clock around twenty thousand pounds →  See also throw your weight around Approximate
(Definition of around from the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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