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English definition of “at”

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at

preposition
 
 
strong /æt/ weak /ət/
PLACE A1 used to show the place or position of something or someone: We met at the station. She was sitting at the table. She's at the library.In and at
TIME A1 used to show the time something happens: The meeting starts at three.Describing when something happened or will happen
DIRECTION A1 towards or in the direction of: She threw the ball at him. He's always shouting at the children.Describing movement towards
ABILITY B1 used after an adjective to show a person's ability to do something: He's good at making friends. I've always been useless at tennis.
CAUSE A2 used to show the cause of something, especially a feeling: We were surprised at the news.Connecting words which introduce a cause or reason
AMOUNT B2 used to show the price, speed, level, etc of something: He denied driving at 120 miles per hour.General words for size and amount
ACTIVITY used to show a state or activity: She was hard at work when I arrived. a country at war
INTERNET A1 the @ symbol, used in email addresses to separate the name of a person, department, etc from the name of the organization or companyConventions used on the Internet and in email
(Definition of at from the Cambridge Learners Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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