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English definition of “away”

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away

adverb
 
 
/əˈweɪ/
DIRECTION A2 to or in a different place or situation: Go away and leave me alone. Fish and chips to take away, please. We'd like to move away from the town centre.Departing
DISTANCE FROM A2 at a particular distance from a place: The nearest town was ten miles away. How far away is the station?Distant in space and time
NOT THERE A2 not at the place where someone usually lives or works: Shirley's feeding the cat while we're away.Absent
SAFE PLACE B1 into a usual or safe place: Can you put everything away when you've finished?Hiding and disguising
two weeks/five hours, etc away B1 at a particular time in the future: My exam's only a week away now.In the future and soon
CONTINUOUS ACTION used after a verb to mean 'continuously or repeatedly': I was still writing away when the exam finished.Continually and repeatedly
GRADUALLY B2 gradually disappearing until almost or completely gone: The snow has melted away.Appearing and disappearing
SPORT If a sports team is playing away, the game is at the place where the other team usually plays. →  See also take your breath away , give the game away Competitions, and parts of competitions
(Definition of away adverb from the Cambridge Learners Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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