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English definition of “bear”

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bear

verb [T]
 
 
/beər/ ( past tense bore, past participle borne)
ACCEPT B2 to accept someone or something unpleasant: She couldn't bear the thought of him suffering. I like her, but I can't bear her friends. [+ to do sth] How can you bear to watch? The pain was too much to bear.Tolerating and enduringCoping and not copingDealing with things or people
bear a resemblance/relation, etc to sb/sth to be similar to someone or something: He bears a striking resemblance to his father.Being or appearing similar or the same
CARRY formal to carry something: He came in, bearing a tray of drinks.Transferring and transporting objects
WEIGHT to support the weight of something: I don't think that chair will bear his weight.Physical supports and supportingArches, columns and beams
bear the responsibility/cost, etc to accept that you are responsible for something, you should pay for something, etc: He must bear some responsibility for the appalling conditions in the prison.Duty, obligation and responsibilityPaying and spending money
FEELING to continue to have a bad feeling towards someone: They were rude to her in the past, but she's not the kind of woman who bears grudges (= continues to be angry).Angry and displeasedBad-tempered
HAVE CHILD formal to give birth to a child: She has been told that she will never bear children.BirthPregnancy
NAME to have or show a particular name, picture, or symbol: The shop bore his family name.Having and owning - general words
bear left/right to turn left or right: Bear right at the next set of traffic lights. →  See also bear fruit , grin and bear it Changing direction
(Definition of bear verb from the Cambridge Learners Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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