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English definition of “between”

between

preposition
 
 
/bɪˈtwiːn/
SPACE A1 in the space that separates two places, people, or things: The town lies halfway between Florence and Rome. A narrow path runs between the two houses.Between
TIME A1 in the period of time that separates two events or times: The shop is closed for lunch between 12.30 and 1.30.Between
INVOLVE A1 involving two or more groups of people: Tonight's game is between the New Orleans Saints and the Los Angeles Rams.Including and containingComprising and consisting of
AMOUNT A2 used to show the largest and smallest amount or level of something: Between 50 and 100 people will lose their jobs.General words for size and amount
CONNECT A2 connecting two or more places or things: There is a regular train service between the two towns.Connecting and combiningVariety and mixturesMixing and mixtures
SEPARATE A2 separating two or more things or people: the gap between rich and poor What's the difference between these two cameras?Separating and dividing
SHARE B1 shared by a particular number of people: We drank two bottles of wine between four of us.Sharing
AMOUNT A2 If something is between two amounts, it is larger than the first amount but smaller than the second: The temperature will be between 20 and 25 degrees today.Statistics
CHOOSE If you choose between two things, you choose one thing or the other.Taking and choosing
(Definition of between preposition from the Cambridge Learners Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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