but conjunction - definition in the Learner's Dictionary - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

English definition of “but”

See all translations

but

conjunction
 
 
strong /bʌt/ weak /bət/
OPPOSITE INFORMATION A1 used to introduce something new that you say, especially something that is different or the opposite from what you have just said: I'd drive you there, but I don't have my car. The tickets were expensive, but the kids really enjoyed it.Connecting words which express a contrast
EXPLAINING WHY used before you say why something did not happen or is not true: I was going to go to his party, but I was sick.Connecting words which express a contrast
SHOWING SURPRISE used to show that you are surprised about what someone has just said: 'Tim is leaving.' 'But why?'Feelings of surprise and amazement
CONNECTING PHRASES used to connect 'excuse me' or 'I'm sorry' with what you say next: Excuse me, but would you mind shutting the door?Polite expressions
Translations of “but”
in Arabic ولَكِن…
in Korean 그러나…
in Malaysian tetapi…
in French mais…
in Turkish fakat, ancak, ama…
in Italian ma, però…
in Chinese (Traditional) 但是,不過, 而, 相反…
in Russian но…
in Polish ale…
in Vietnamese nhưng mà…
in Spanish pero…
in Portuguese mas…
in Thai แต่…
in German aber…
in Catalan però…
in Japanese しかし, だが…
in Indonesian tetapi…
in Chinese (Simplified) 但是,不过, 而, 相反…
(Definition of but conjunction from the Cambridge Learners Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definitions of “but” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day

cost/charge the earth

to cost, charge, etc. a lot of money

Word of the Day

The language of elections

by Liz Walter,
April 22, 2015
On May 7th, citizens of the UK will be going to the polls (having an election) to decide who will form the next government. This kind of election is known as a general election. The country is divided into 650 areas, called constituencies. Each constituency elects a member of parliament (MP) to

Read More 

dumbwalking noun

April 20, 2015
walking slowly, without paying attention to the world around you because you are consulting a smartphone He told me dumbwalking probably wouldn’t be a long-term problem.

Read More