Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

English definition of “but”

See all translations

but

conjunction
 
 
strong /bʌt/ weak /bət/
OPPOSITE INFORMATION A1 used to introduce something new that you say, especially something that is different or the opposite from what you have just said: I'd drive you there, but I don't have my car. The tickets were expensive, but the kids really enjoyed it.Connecting words which express a contrast
EXPLAINING WHY used before you say why something did not happen or is not true: I was going to go to his party, but I was sick.Connecting words which express a contrast
SHOWING SURPRISE used to show that you are surprised about what someone has just said: 'Tim is leaving.' 'But why?'Feelings of surprise and amazement
CONNECTING PHRASES used to connect 'excuse me' or 'I'm sorry' with what you say next: Excuse me, but would you mind shutting the door?Polite expressions
Translations of “but”
in Korean 그러나…
in Arabic ولَكِن…
in French mais…
in Turkish fakat, ancak, ama…
in Italian ma, però…
in Chinese (Traditional) 但是,不過, 而, 相反…
in Russian но…
in Polish ale…
in Spanish pero…
in Portuguese mas…
in German aber…
in Catalan però…
in Japanese しかし, だが…
in Chinese (Simplified) 但是,不过, 而, 相反…
(Definition of but conjunction from the Cambridge Learners Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definitions of “but” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day

be as cold as ice

to be extremely cold

Word of the Day

Let’s celebrate! (words and phrases for parties)

by Kate Woodford,
December 17, 2014
​​​ With Christmas and New Year almost upon us, we thought it a good time to look at the language of parties and celebrations. First, let’s start with the word ‘party’ itself. To have or throw a party or, less commonly, to give a party is to arrange a party: We’re having a

Read More 

cinderella surgery noun

December 15, 2014
cosmetic surgery to the feet We have all heard of people having nose jobs, boob jobs and liposuction – but now a new trend growing in popularity in America: Cinderella surgery.

Read More