care noun Meaning in the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Meaning of “care” - Learner’s Dictionary

care

noun     /keər/
PROTECTION [U]
B2 the activity of looking after something or someone, especially someone who is young, old, or sick: skin/hair care A small baby requires constant care.Protection and protectorsEnvironmental issuesTreating and caring for people
ATTENTION [U]
B1 If you do something with care, you give a lot of attention to it so that you do not make a mistake or damage anything: She planned the trip with great care. Fragile - please handle with care.Paying attention and being carefulCautious and vigilant
take care
to give a lot of attention to what you are doing so that you do not have an accident or make a mistake: The roads are very icy so take care when you drive home.Paying attention and being carefulCautious and vigilant
Take care! informal
A2 used when saying goodbye to someone: See you soon, Bob - take care!Welcoming, greeting and greetings
WORRY [C]
a feeling of worry: He was sixteen years old and didn't have a care in the world (= had no worries).Anxiety and worry - general wordsFear and phobias
in care UK
Children who are in care are looked after by government organizations because their parents cannot look after them: She was put/taken into care at the age of twelve.Social services and sanitation
take care of sb/sth
B1 to look after someone or something: My parents are going to take care of the house while we're away.Treating and caring for people
take care of sth/doing sth
to be responsible for dealing with something: I sorted out the drink for the party while Guy took care of the food. →  See also intensive care Duty, obligation and responsibility
(Definition of care noun from the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website
There, their and they’re – which one should you use?
There, their and they’re – which one should you use?
by ,
April 27, 2016
by Liz Walter If you are a learner of English and you are confused about the words there, their and they’re, let me reassure you: many, many people with English as their first language share your problem! You only have to take a look at the ‘comments’ sections on the website of, for example, a popular

Read More 

Word of the Day

sample

a small amount of something that shows you what the rest is or should be like

Word of the Day

bio-banding noun
bio-banding noun
April 25, 2016
in sport, grouping children according to their physical maturity rather than their age ‘When we’re grouping children for sports, we do it by age groups, but the problem is that, within those age groups, we get huge variations in biological age,’ said Dr Sean Cumming, senior lecturer at the University of Bath’s department for

Read More