Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

English definition of “certain”

See all translations

certain

adjective
 
 
/ˈsɜːtən/
NO DOUBT [never before noun] B1 completely sure of something, or knowing without doubt that something is true: [+ (that)] I feel absolutely certain that you're doing the right thing. [+ question word] Nobody was certain how the accident had happened. He was quite certain about/of the thief's identity. →  Opposite uncertain CertaintyConfidence and self-assurance
know/say for certain to know something without doubt: We don't know for certain whether she's coming.CertaintyConfidence and self-assurance
SURE TO HAPPEN B1 sure to happen, to do something, or to be true: [+ (that)] It now looks certain that she will resign. [+ to do sth] She is certain to do well UK in the exams/ US on the exams. How can we make certain that (= do something to be sure that) she sees the note? One thing is certain. Her attacker knew where she lived.CertaintyConfidence and self-assurance
PARTICULAR [always before noun] B1 used to refer to a particular person or thing without naming or describing them exactly: The museum is only open at certain times of the day. Certain people react badly to these drugs.Particular and individual
a certain B2 used before a noun to mean existing, but difficult to describe the exact quality or amount: He's got a certain charm. You have to have a certain amount of courage to perform in public.Particular and individual
certain of formal used to refer to some of a group of people or things: Certain of you already know the news.Some and quite
(Definition of certain from the Cambridge Learners Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

More Learner's Dictionary definitions for “certain”

Definitions of “certain” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day

be as cold as ice

to be extremely cold

Word of the Day

Cleavage proves divisive in Cambridge’s words of 2014

by Alastair Horne,
December 19, 2014
​​​​ Other dictionaries may choose faddish novelties as their words of the year, but here at Cambridge, we like to do something different. We look for the words that have seen sudden surges in searches over the course of the year – words that have been baffling users of English and driven them

Read More 

cinderella surgery noun

December 15, 2014
cosmetic surgery to the feet We have all heard of people having nose jobs, boob jobs and liposuction – but now a new trend growing in popularity in America: Cinderella surgery.

Read More