certain - definition in the Learner's Dictionary - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “certain”

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certain

adjective
 
 
/ˈsɜːtən/
NO DOUBT [never before noun] B1 completely sure of something, or knowing without doubt that something is true: [+ (that)] I feel absolutely certain that you're doing the right thing. [+ question word] Nobody was certain how the accident had happened. He was quite certain about/of the thief's identity. →  Opposite uncertain CertaintyConfidence and self-assurance
know/say for certain to know something without doubt: We don't know for certain whether she's coming.CertaintyConfidence and self-assurance
SURE TO HAPPEN B1 sure to happen, to do something, or to be true: [+ (that)] It now looks certain that she will resign. [+ to do sth] She is certain to do well UK in the exams/ US on the exams. How can we make certain that (= do something to be sure that) she sees the note? One thing is certain. Her attacker knew where she lived.CertaintyConfidence and self-assurance
PARTICULAR [always before noun] B1 used to refer to a particular person or thing without naming or describing them exactly: The museum is only open at certain times of the day. Certain people react badly to these drugs.Particular and individual
a certain B2 used before a noun to mean existing, but difficult to describe the exact quality or amount: He's got a certain charm. You have to have a certain amount of courage to perform in public.Particular and individual
certain of formal used to refer to some of a group of people or things: Certain of you already know the news.Some and quite
(Definition of certain from the Cambridge Learners Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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