change verb Meaning in the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary

Meaning of “change” - Learner’s Dictionary


DIFFERENT [I, T] A2 to become different, or to make someone or something become different: I hadn't seen her for twenty years, but she hadn't changed a bit. Meeting you has changed my life. She's changed from being a happy, healthy child to being ill all the time. Since he met her, he's a changed man. changing attitudesChangingAdapting and modifying Adapting and attuning to somethingChanging frequently
FROM ONE THING TO ANOTHER [I, T] A1 to stop having or using one thing, and start having or using another: The doctor has recommended changing my diet. I'll have to ask them if they can change the time of my interview. You'll have to change gear to go up the hill.ChangingAdapting and modifying Adapting and attuning to somethingChanging frequently
CLOTHES [I, T] A2 to take off your clothes and put on different ones: He changed out of his school uniform into jeans and a T-shirt. Is there somewhere I can get changed?Putting clothes on
JOURNEY [I, T] A2 to get off a bus, plane, etc and catch another, in order to continue a journey: I have to change trains in Paris. Is there a direct service, or do we have to change?Boarding and alighting from modes of transport
IN SHOP [T] UK B1 to take something you have bought back to a shop and exchange it for something else: If the dress doesn't fit, can I change it for a smaller one?Replacing and exchanging
MONEY [T] A2 to get or give someone money in exchange for money of a different type: Where can I change my dollars? Can you change a 20 euro note for two tens?Replacing and exchangingForms of money and methods of payment
BED [T] to take dirty sheets off a bed and put on clean ones: to change the bed/sheetsRemoving and getting rid of thingsTaking things away from someone or somewhere
BABY [T] to put a clean nappy (= thick cloth worn on a baby's bottom) on a baby →  See also chop and change , change hands , change your tune Putting clothes on
(Definition of change verb from the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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