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English definition of “cover”

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cover

verb [T]
 
 
/ˈkʌvər/
PUT A2 to put something over something else, in order to protect or hide it: They covered him with a blanket. He covered his face with his hands. →  Opposite uncover Covering and adding layersDefending and protectingBacking, supporting and defendingPreserving and saving
LAYER B1 to form a layer on the surface of something: Snow covered the trees. My legs were covered in/with mud.Covering and adding layers
DISTANCE B2 to travel a particular distance: We covered 700 kilometres in four days.Travelling
AREA B2 to be a particular size or area: The town covers an area of 10 square miles.General words for size and amount
INCLUDE B1 to include or deal with a subject or piece of information: The book covers European history from 1789-1914.Including and containingComprising and consisting of
REPORT B2 to report on an event for a newspaper, television programme, etc: Dave was asked to cover the Olympics.Media in generalThe press and news reporting
MONEY to be enough money to pay for something: 100 euros should cover the cost of the repairs.EnoughPaying and spending money
FINANCIAL PROTECTION to provide financial protection if something bad happens: You need travel insurance that covers accident and injury. →  See also touch/cover all the bases Insurance
(Definition of cover verb from the Cambridge Learners Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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