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Meaning of “credit” - Learner’s Dictionary

credit

noun     /ˈkredɪt/
PAYMENT [U]
B1 a way of buying something in which you arrange to pay for it at a later time: We offer interest-free credit on all new cars. He bought most of the furniture on credit.Borrowing, lending and debtForms of money and methods of payment
PRAISE [U]
B2 praise that is given to someone for something they have done: I did most of the work but Dan got all the credit! We should give her credit for her honesty. I can't take full credit for this meal - Sam helped.Praising and applaudingExaggerating and playing down
be a credit to sb/sth
to do something that makes a person or organization proud of you: Giorgio is a credit to his family.Praising and applaudingExaggerating and playing down
to sb's credit
If something is to someone's credit, they deserve praise for it: To his credit, Bill never blamed her for the incident.Praising and applaudingExaggerating and playing down
have sth to your credit
to have achieved something: By the age of 25, she had five novels to her credit.Success and achievementsHigher and lower points of achievementFailures
in credit
having money in your bank accountBanks and bank accounts
MONEY [C]
B1 an amount of money that you put into your bank account →  Opposite debit noun Forms of money and methods of paymentBanks and bank accounts
COURSE [C]
B2 a unit that shows you have completed part of a college courseClasses, courses and courseworkSchool and vocational qualifications
(Definition of credit noun from the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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