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English definition of “down”

down

adverb, preposition
 
 
/daʊn/
LOWER PLACE A2 towards or in a lower place: The kids ran down the hill to the gate. She tripped and fell down. I bent down to have a look.Down and downwardMoving downwards
LEVEL/AMOUNT towards or at a lower level or amount: Can you turn the music down? Slow down so they can see us.Raising and lowering
SURFACE A1 moving from above and onto a surface: I sat down and turned on the TV. Put that box down on the floor.Down and downwardMoving downwards
DIRECTION in or towards a particular direction, usually south: Pete's moved down to London.Down and downwardMoving downwards
down the road/river, etc A2 along or further along the road/river, etc: There's another pub further down the street.Through, across, opposite and against
note/write, etc sth down B1 to write something on a piece of paper: Can I just take down your phone number?Writing and typing
STOMACH inside your stomach: He's had food poisoning and can't keep anything down.Down and downwardMoving downwards
be down to sb UK to be someone's responsibility or decision: I've done all I can now, the rest is down to you.Duty, obligation and responsibility
come/go down with sth to become sick: The whole family came down with food poisoning.Being and falling ill
(Definition of down adverb, preposition from the Cambridge Learners Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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