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Meaning of “drive” - Learner’s Dictionary

drive

verb     /draɪv/ ( past tense drove, past participle driven)
CONTROL VEHICLE [I, T]
to make a car, bus, or train move, and control what it does: She's learning to drive. He drives a red sports car.Driving and operating road vehicles
TRAVEL [I, T]
A1 to travel somewhere in a car, or to take someone somewhere in a car: We decided to drive to the airport. My friend drove me home last night.Driving and operating road vehicles
drive sb out/away/from, etc
to force someone to leave a place: The supermarket has driven many small shops out of the area.Punishing someone by sending them somewhere elseEvicting and forcing to leave
drive sb crazy/mad/wild, etc
B2 to make someone feel crazy, annoyed, or excited: That noise is driving me mad.Causing feelings of anger and displeasureSexual activity in generalPhysical and sexual assault and abduction
drive sb to sth; drive sb to do sth
to make someone have a bad feeling or do something bad: The arguments and violence drove her to leave home.Causing somebody to actUrging and persuading
drive sth into/through/towards, etc
to push something somewhere by hitting it hard: He drove the nail into the wall with a hammer.Pushing and shoving
MAKE WORK [T]
to provide the power or energy that makes someone or something work: [often passive] She was driven by greed and ambition. →  See also drive/send sb round the bend , drive sb up the wall Machinery and machinesHousehold equipment and domestic chores
(Definition of drive verb from the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
Avoiding common errors with the word enough.
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by Liz Walter Enough is a very common word, but it is easy to make mistakes with it. You need to be careful about its position in a sentence, and the prepositions or verb patterns that come after it. I’ll start with the position of enough in the sentence. When we use it with a noun,

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