drop verb Meaning in the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Meaning of “drop” - Learner’s Dictionary

drop

verb     /drɒp/ ( present participle dropping, past tense and past participle dropped)
LET FALL [T] to let something you are carrying fall to the ground: She tripped and dropped the vase. The dog dropped the stick at my feet.Falling and droppingMoving downwards
FALL [I] B1 to fall: The ball dropped to the ground.Falling and droppingMoving downwards
BECOME LESS [I] B2 If a level or amount drops, it becomes less: Unemployment has dropped from 8% to 6% in the last year.Becoming and making smaller or lessBecoming and making less strong
TAKE [T] ( also drop off) to take someone or something to a place, usually by car as you travel somewhere else: I can drop you at the station on my way to work.Taking someone somewhere or telling them the way
STOP ACTIVITY [T] B2 If you drop a plan, activity, or idea, you stop doing or planning it: Plans for a new supermarket have been dropped. When we heard the news, we dropped everything (= stopped what we were doing) and rushed to the hospital.Stop having or doing something
STOP INCLUDING [T] to decide to stop including someone in a group or team: The coach dropped me from the team.Removing and getting rid of thingsTaking things away from someone or somewhere
drop it/the subject to stop talking about something, especially because it is annoying or upsetting someoneRemoving and getting rid of thingsTaking things away from someone or somewhereCausing something to endComing to an end
VOICE [I, T] If your voice drops, or if you drop your voice, you talk more quietly. →  See also be dropping like flies (fly) Silence and quiet
COMPUTING to put text, a file, a picture, etc. in a particular place on a computer screen using your mouse: Just drag and drop the images into your presentation.Operating computers
(Definition of drop verb from the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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