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Meaning of “face” - Learner’s Dictionary

face

noun     /feɪs/
HEAD [C]
A1 the front part of the head where the eyes, nose, and mouth are, or the expression on this part: She's got a long, thin face. I can't wait to see her face when she opens the present.The head and face
make a face ( also UK pull a face)
B1 to show with your face that you do not like someone or something: The baby made a face every time I offered her some food.Grimacing and frowning
make faces
to make silly expressions with your face in order to try and make people laughGrimacing and frowning
sb's face falls/lights up
someone starts to look disappointed/happy: His face fell when I said that she wasn't coming.Grimacing and frowningLaughing and smiling
to sb's face
B2 If you say something unpleasant to someone's face, you say it to them directly, when you are with them: If you've got something to say, say it to my face.PresentAvailable and accessibleUnavailable and inaccessible
SURFACE
the front or surface of something: the north face of the cliff a clock faceSurfaces of objectsEdges and extremities of objects
in the face of sth
while having to deal with a difficult situation or problem: She refused to leave him, in the face of increasing pressure from friends and family.Difficult situations and unpleasant experiencesAccidents and disasters
on the face of it
used when you are describing how a situation seems, when this is different to what it is really like: On the face of it, it seems like a bargain, but I bet there are hidden costs.Seeming and purporting to beFaking and pretending
→  See also have egg on your face , a slap in the face , keep a straight face , lose/save face
(Definition of face noun from the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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