figure noun Meaning in the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary

Meaning of “figure” - Learner’s Dictionary


noun [C]
SYMBOL B1 a symbol for a number: Write down the amount in words and figures. He's now being paid a six-figure salary.Numbers generally
single/double, etc figures numbers from 0 to 9/numbers from 10 to 99, etcNumbers generally
AMOUNT B1 a number that expresses an amount, especially in official documents: Government figures show a rise in unemployment.Numbers generally
TYPE OF PERSON B2 a particular type of person, often someone important or famous: a mysterious figure Lincoln was a major figure in American politics.Important people and describing important peopleFamous peopleWealthy peopleFame and famous
PERSON B2 a person that you cannot see clearly: I could see two figures in the distance.The body
BODY SHAPE B1 the shape of someone's body, usually an attractive shape: She's got a good figure for her age.The body
PICTURE ( written abbreviation fig.) a picture or drawing in a book or document, usually with a number: Look at the graph shown in Figure 2. →  See also father figure PicturesTables, graphs and diagrams
(Definition of figure noun from the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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