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English definition of “foot”

foot

noun
 
 
/fʊt/
BODY PART [C] (plural feet) A1 one of the two flat parts on the ends of your legs that you stand on: bare feet He stepped on my foot. The foot
MEASUREMENT [C] (plural foot, feet) (written abbreviation ft) B1 a unit for measuring length, equal to 0.3048 metres or 12 inches: Alex is about 6 feet tall. an eight foot high wall Measurements of length and distanceArea, mass, weight and volume in general
the foot of sth the bottom of something such as stairs, a hill, a bed, or a page: Put the notes at the foot of the page.Words meaning parts of things
on foot A2 If you go somewhere on foot, you walk there.Moving on foot
be on your feet to be standing and not sitting: I'm exhausted, I've been on my feet all day.The foot
put your feet up to relax, especially by sitting with your feet supported above the ground: You put your feet up for half an hour before the kids get home.Calming and relaxing
set foot in/on sth to go into a place or onto a piece of land: He told me never to set foot in his house again.Arriving, entering and invading
get/rise to your feet to stand up after you have been sitting: The audience rose to their feet.The foot
(Definition of foot noun from the Cambridge Learners Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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