form verb Meaning in the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary

Meaning of “form” - Learner’s Dictionary


BEGIN [I, T] B2 to begin to exist, or to make something begin to exist: [often passive] We are learning more about how stars are formed. The trees form new leaves once the weather improves.Causing things to happen
SHAPE [I, T] to take or to make something take a particular shape: Hold hands and form a circle. Form the dough into little balls.Patterns and shapes
COMBINE [T] B1 to make something by combining different parts: In English you form the present participle by adding -ing to the verb.Connecting and combiningVariety and mixturesMixing and mixtures
START [T] B2 to start an organization or business: Brown formed her own company eleven years ago.Starting, succeeding and failing in business
BE [T] to be the thing talked about or be part of it: The Alps form a natural barrier between Italy and Switzerland. Her diary forms the basis of the book.Comprising and consisting ofIncluding and containing
form an opinion/impression, etc to begin to have a particular opinion or idea about something because of the information you haveOpinions, beliefs and points of view
(Definition of form verb from the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website
Word of the Day


a large group of soldiers who form a part of an army, especially the ancient Roman army

Word of the Day

There is no such thing as a true synonym in English. Discuss!
There is no such thing as a true synonym in English. Discuss!
by Kate Woodford,
November 25, 2015
In the Cambridge Advanced Learner’s Dictionary the word ‘synonym’ is defined as ‘a word or phrase that has the same or nearly the same meaning as another word or phrase in the same language’. As you might expect, definitions for this word are broadly similar in other dictionaries and yet the italicized

Read More 

conversational user interface noun
conversational user interface noun
November 30, 2015
a computer interface that provides information to users in normal, conversational speech in response to spoken requests Nearly every major tech company—from Amazon to Intel to Microsoft to Google—is chasing the sort of conversational user interface that Kaplan and his colleagues at PARC imagined decades ago.

Read More