high adjective Meaning in the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary Cambridge dictionaries logo

Meaning of “high” - Learner’s Dictionary

high

adjective     /haɪ/
TALL A2 having a large distance from the bottom to the top: a high building/mountainHigh, tall and deepBig and quite bigEnormous
ABOVE GROUND B1 a large distance above the ground or the level of the sea: a high shelf/window The village was high up in the mountains.High, tall and deepBig and quite bigEnormous
MEASUREMENT used to say how big the distance is from the top of something to the bottom, or how far above the ground something is: How high is it? It's ten metres high.Measurements in generalHigh, tall and deepBig and quite bigEnormous
AMOUNT B1 great in amount, size, or level: a high temperature high prices/costs The car sped away at high speed.Measurements in generalBig and quite bigEnormous
VERY GOOD B1 very good: high standards/qualityExtremely good
IMPORTANT B2 important, powerful, or at the top level of something: a high rank Safety is our highest priority.Being important and having importancePosition and status in groups and organizations
DRUGS If someone is high, they are behaving in an unusual way because they have taken an illegal drug: The whole band seemed to be high on heroin.Drugs - general wordsSpecific types of drug
SOUND A high sound or note is near the top of the set of sounds that people can hear.Technical music termsDescribing qualities of soundDescribing qualities of the human voice
high in sth If a food is high in something, it contains a lot of it: Avoid foods that are high in salt.Food - general words
(Definition of high adjective from the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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