hit verb - definition in the Learner's Dictionary - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “hit”

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hit

verb
 
 
/hɪt/ ( present participle hitting, past tense and past participle hit)
HAND [T] A2 to touch something quickly and with force using your hand or an object in your hand: She hit him on the head with her tennis racket.Hitting and beatingPunishing by causing painHitting against objects accidentally and colliding
TOUCH [T] B1 to touch someone or something quickly and with force, usually causing injury or damage: The car skidded and hit a wall. As she fell, she hit her head on the pavement.Hitting and beatingPunishing by causing painPhysical and sexual assault and abductionSexual activity in generalHitting against objects accidentally and colliding
AFFECT [I, T] B2 to affect something badly: [often passive] The economy has been hit by high unemployment.Damaging and spoilingDestroying and demolishing
REACH [T] to reach a place, position, or state: Our profits have already hit $1 million.Arriving, entering and invading
THINK [T] informal If an idea or thought hits you, you suddenly think of it: The idea for the book hit me in the middle of the night.Inspiration and inspiring
→  See also hit sb hard , hit the jackpot , hit the nail on the head , hit the roof , hit it off , hit back , hit on/upon sth
(Definition of hit verb from the Cambridge Learners Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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