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Meaning of “in” - Learner’s Dictionary

in

adverb     /ɪn/
INTO A SPACE
A2 into an area or space from the outside of it: He rushed in halfway through the meeting. Annie opened the car door and threw her luggage in.In and at
AT A PLACE
B1 at the place where a person usually lives or works: I called her, but she wasn't in. Could you ask him to phone me when he gets in?In and at
TRAIN/PLANE
B1 If a train, plane, etc is in, it has arrived at the place it was going to: My train gets in at 17.54.Arriving, entering and invading
SENT
B2 given or sent to someone official in order to be read: Applications must be in by 28th February.Delivering and despatching
TOWARDS LAND
used when the sea or a ship moves close to land: Let's go - the tide is coming in.Describing movement towards
be in for sth informal
If someone is in for a surprise, treat, shock, etc, it will happen to them soon: If he thinks looking after a baby is easy, he's in for a shock.About to happenCloseness in distance and time
be in on sth informal
If you are in on something, you know about it or are involved in it: Were you in on the surprise? Please let me in on (= tell me) the secret.Knowledge and awarenessTaking part and getting involvedGetting involved for one's own benefit or against others' will
SPORT UK
In cricket and similar sports, if a person or team is in, they are taking a turn to play.CricketGeneral terms used in ball sports
be in for it ( also UK be for it) informal
to be in troublePunishing and punishmentsPunishing by causing painHitting and beating
(Definition of in adverb from the Cambridge Learner’s Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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