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English definition of “mind”

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mind

verb
 
 
/maɪnd/
BE ANNOYED [I, T] B1 to be annoyed or worried by something: Do you think he'd mind if I borrowed his book? [+ doing sth] Tim won't mind lending you his car. He doesn't seem to mind doing all the driving. I don't mind taking her (= I am willing to take her) if you're too busy.Anxious and worriedAngry and displeasedBad-tempered
LOOK AFTER [T] to look after someone or something: Could you mind my suitcase while I go to the toilet? Who's minding the baby?Duty, obligation and responsibility
do you mind/would you mind A2 something you say when politely asking someone to do something: Do you mind not smoking in here, please? Would you mind if I borrowed your phone?Polite expressions
BE CAREFUL [T] B1 something you say when telling someone to be careful with something dangerous: Mind the iron - it's still very hot!Paying attention and being carefulCautious and vigilant
never mind A2 something that you say to tell someone that something is not important: "I forgot to bring any money." "Never mind, you can pay me next week."Neglecting and ignoringNot paying attentionTreating as unimportantOf little or less importancePolite expressions something you say to emphasize that something is impossible: I can't afford to buy a bike, never mind a car!Impossible and improbable
mind you something you say before saying the opposite of what you have just said: We had a lovely holiday in France. Mind you, the weather was appalling.Connecting words which express a contrast
(Definition of mind verb from the Cambridge Learners Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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