Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

English definition of “near”

See all translations

near

adverb, preposition
 
 
/nɪər/
DISTANCE A1 not far away in distance: Could you come a bit nearer, please? I stood near the window. They live in a small village near the Danish border. Are you going anywhere near the post office?Closeness in distance and timeAbout to happen
be/come near to doing sth to almost achieve or do something: This is the nearest I've ever got to winning anything. He came near to punching him.AlmostMerely and barely
STATE If something or someone is near a particular state, they are almost in that state: She looked near exhaustion. Climbing that mountain is near impossible without ropes. She was near to tears (= almost crying) when I told her.AlmostMerely and barely
TIME B2 not far away in time: She shouldn't be partying so near her exams. We can decide nearer the time.Closeness in distance and timeAbout to happen
SIMILAR similar: The feelings I had were near hysteria. He is Russia's nearest thing to a rock legend.Similar and the sameDescribing people with the same qualities
nowhere near not close in distance, amount, time, or quality: It wasn't me - I was nowhere near him. That's nowhere near enough for six people. It was nowhere near as difficult as I thought it would be.Distant in space and time
near enough almost: The books were ordered near enough alphabetically.AlmostMerely and barely
(Definition of near adverb, preposition from the Cambridge Learners Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definitions of “near” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day

punt

a long, narrow boat with a flat bottom and a square area at each end, moved by a person standing on one of the square areas and pushing a long pole against the bottom of the river

Word of the Day

Byronic, Orwellian and Darwinian: adjectives from names.

by Liz Walter,
April 15, 2015
Becoming an adjective is a strange kind of memorial, but it is often a sign of a person having had real influence on the world. Science is full of examples, from Hippocrates, the Greek medic born around 460 BC, who gave his name to the Hippocratic Oath still used by doctors today,

Read More 

dumbwalking noun

April 20, 2015
walking slowly, without paying attention to the world around you because you are consulting a smartphone He told me dumbwalking probably wouldn’t be a long-term problem.

Read More