Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

English definition of “note”

See all translations

note

noun
 
 
/nəʊt/
LETTER [C] A1 a short letter: He left a note on her desk. Did you get my note?Letters, notes and cardsPaper and stationery
INFORMATION [C] A2 words that you write down to help you remember something: She studied her notes before the exam. Let me make a note of (= write) your phone number. The doctor took notes (= wrote information) while my wife described her symptoms.Letters, notes and cardsPaper and stationeryPieces of writing
EXPLANATION [C] a short explanation or an extra piece of information that is given at the bottom of a page or at the back of a book: See note 3, page 37.Letters, notes and cardsPaper and stationeryPieces of writing
FEELING [no plural] a particular feeling or mood: a sad/serious/positive note His speech had just the right note of sympathy.Feelings - general words
MUSIC [C] a single musical sound or the symbol that represents itNotes of the musical scale
MONEY [C] UK ( US bill) B1 a piece of paper money: a ten-pound noteForms of money and methods of payment
take note (of sth) to pay careful attention to something: Make sure you take note of what she says. Safety standards are being tightened. Employers, take note.Paying attention and being carefulCautious and vigilant
sb/sth of note formal someone or something famous or important: A medieval church is the only monument of note in the town.ImportanceUseful or advantageous
(Definition of note noun from the Cambridge Learners Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definitions of “note” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day

limber up

to do gentle exercises to stretch the muscles in order to prepare the body for more active physical exercise

Word of the Day

Byronic, Orwellian and Darwinian: adjectives from names.

by Liz Walter,
April 15, 2015
Becoming an adjective is a strange kind of memorial, but it is often a sign of a person having had real influence on the world. Science is full of examples, from Hippocrates, the Greek medic born around 460 BC, who gave his name to the Hippocratic Oath still used by doctors today,

Read More 

bio-inspiration noun

April 13, 2015
the adoption of patterns and structures found in nature for the purposes of engineering, manufacturing, science, etc. The MIT researchers actually aren’t the only robotics team to turn to cheetahs for bio-inspiration.

Read More