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English definition of “open”

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open

verb
 
 
/ˈəʊpən/
NOT CLOSED [I, T] A1 If something opens, it changes to a position that is not closed, and if you open it, you make it change to a position that is not closed: to open a door/window The gate won't open. Don't open your eyes yet.Unfastening and opening
REMOVE COVER [T] A2 to remove part of a container or parcel so that you can see or use what it contains: Karen opened the box and looked inside. Why don't you open the envelope? I can't open this bottle.Unfastening and opening
PREPARE FOR USE [I, T] If an object opens, the parts that are folded together move apart, and if you open it, you make the parts that are folded together move apart: Shall I open the umbrella? Open your books at page 22.Unfastening and opening
START WORK [I] A2 If a shop or office opens at a particular time of day, it starts to do business at that time: What time does the bank open?Starting and beginningStarting again
COMPUTERS [T] B1 to make a computer document or program ready to be read or usedOperating computers
START OFFICIALLY [I, T] B2 If a business or activity opens, it starts officially for the first time, and if you open it, you make it start officially for the first time: That restaurant's new - it only opened last month. Several shops have opened up in the last year.Starting, succeeding and failing in business
MAKE AVAILABLE [T] to allow people to use a road or area: They opened up the roads again the day after the flooding.Available and accessiblePresent
open an account to make an arrangement to keep your money with a bank: Have you opened a bank account yet? →  See also open the floodgates Banks and bank accounts
(Definition of open verb from the Cambridge Learners Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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